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Statement Problem Teenage Pregnancy Essays

Essay about Sample Research Proposal on Teenage Pregnancy

1172 WordsOct 24th, 20135 Pages

Sample Research Proposal on Teenage Pregnancy

Introduction
This research proposal implies on teenage pregnancy and its effect on academic progression. There will be association between teenage pregnancy and academic progression places evidence that education should put weight on reality adhering to teenage pregnancy. Understanding teenage pregnancy within UK context is adamant to the purpose of study. Thus, the expectation that teenage pregnancy will be reduced by proper academic programs, school based prevention ways towards teenage pregnancy. The need to find out basis if such teenage pregnancy has positive effect on academic progression, meaning towards a positive behavior of teenagers while having their academic life. Another…show more content…

How teenage pregnancy be prevented given the fact that education plays a crucial factor for disseminating imperative information? Explain
What is meant by academic progression? How does it relate to teenage pregnancy?
What are positive effects of teenage pregnancy on academic progression of college students? Provide cases/ examples
What are negative effects of teenage pregnancy on academic progression of college students? Provide cases/ examples
What are several options to prevent teenage pregnancy? (School based prevention, approaches are to be applied)
How education and resolution is being realized in accordance to teenage pregnancy? Cite literature support base

Aims and objectives
Research aims to recognize teenage pregnancy among college students particularly first year and second year college students in the UK and be able to find out positive and negative effects of teenage pregnancy towards academic progression, academic life of teenagers. Literature studies of teenage pregnancy and its outcomes will be reviewed; state of current knowledge will be assessed. The effectiveness of academic oriented programs for pregnant teenagers is to be examined accordingly. The research will be aiming to explore the timing of pregnancy in relation to leaving or finishing college. The main objective will be the examination of academic factors and decision to terminate or continue teenage pregnancy while

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Abstract

In recent years, a nationwide concern over the "epidemic" of teenage pregnancy has developed. Explanations for this phenomenon have ranged from poor sex education to promiscuity. This statement will review current data and information so that pediatricians responsible for the health care of adolescents can appreciate the implications and consequences of early childbearing.

SEXUAL ACTIVITY AMONG ADOLESCENT GIRLS

The term adolescence must be used with caution in describing the rapid biological, psychologic, and cognitive changes that take place during the teen years. Teenage girls are considerably different from each other in pubertal and emotional development. In making observations and interpretations about the attitudes, behaviors, and sexual activity of teenage girls, we must use developmental age rather than chronologic age as the standard for comparison. Sexual activity in 12-year-old girls living in intact households1,2 is unusual; therefore, the number of live infants born to mothers in this age group is small. However, more than 50% of 19-year-old girls have engaged in sexual activity, and their fertility rate is comparable to women in their 20s.

The current problems with teenage pregnancies cannot be appreciated fully without understanding adolescent sexual behavior and the secular changes that have taken place. From 1900 to the early 1960s, sexual behavior in the unmarried, teenage population changed. A review of the earlier literature indicates that a significant increase (tenfold) in the incidence of sexual intercourse among single, teenage girls occurred in the early part of this century.3 Measureable changes in the attitude of adolescents toward sexuality became strikingly apparent in the 1960s.

  • Copyright ¬© 1979 by the American Academy of Pediatrics