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Homework For Toddlers

This ever-growing collection of fun, printable, preschool worksheets includes material which introduces various concepts, reinforces color recognition, improves fine motor skills, and introduces numbers and letters. All of these preschool worksheets are intended to enhance your child's skills and introduce new concepts in a fun, stress-free manner.

Each child learns and develops according to their own timeline. If your child has already mastered a skill presented here you may want to browse through the kindergarten worksheets or first grade worksheets for more challenging materials.

You may print these preschool worksheets for your own personal (includes printing materials for your classroom), non-commercial use only. Please be familiar with these Terms of Use before using any worksheets from this site.

In order to view and print worksheets from this site you will need Adobe Reader version 6 or later. You may download the latest version of the free Adobe Reader here.

Printing Tip: If a worksheet page does not appear properly, reload or refresh the .pdf file.

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Preschool Worksheet Preview


 

 

Preschool Shapes Worksheets



Recognize, trace, count, and color squares, circles, triangles, and other geometric shapes.
Preschool Shape Worksheets
Preschool Coloring Pages



Fun coloring pages about the alphabet, animals, familiar objects, and more!
Preschool Coloring Pages
Preschool Planner



Plan an entire week of activities to promote language, number sense, and motor skills.
Preschool Planner

 

All worksheets created by Tracey Smith.









Did you know that . . .
many hours and resources have been dedicated to providing you with these educational materials. The materials found on this site are available for you to print and use with your child or the students in your class. The worksheets on this site are copyrighted and are the property of tlsbooks.com. By using this site, you agree to be bound by these Terms of Use. Please do not post/display/frame any worksheets or copy entire pages of worksheet links on another web site, blog, file storage system, etc. Thank you for your consideration and continued patronage.


This site has hundreds of preschool worksheets to use at home or in the classroom.

At a glance

  • Reading and problem solving are good activities for your child to do at home.
  • Play is an important part of your child's learning.
  • Any homework should reinforce what your child learns in class.
  • Schools develop homework policies with the help of teachers and parents.
  • If your child is having difficulties with any homework activities speak to their teacher.

Public schools in NSW don't expect children in Kindergarten to complete formal homework. They encourage families to read with their children and be involved in family activities that assist the development of their skills in reading, mathematics and problem solving to make the most of what they are learning.

Learning through play

Thea Eyles, an early childhood expert with the NSW Department of Education and Communities, says young children in the early years of school need the time to play.

Homework should help build good learning habits; it shouldn't exhaust or turn kids off. Ken OlahNSW Department of Education and Communities

"I think the most powerful message around the homework issue for parents of children who are in Kindergarten and Year 1 is that playing is learning," Thea says.

"Early childhood educators know the importance of learning through play – it is this philosophy that forms the basis of early childhood education, and all of the international research supports this approach."

Formal homework

More formal homework usually starts in Years 1 and 2 where children may be asked to complete some maths, simple writing tasks, or an activity sheet. The purpose of this homework is to reinforce what has been learnt in class.

Homework helps:

  • to bridge the gap between learning at school and learning at home.
  • parents to see what their child can do and to be involved in their learning.
  • improve children's concentration and focus.
  • children to retain and understand what they've been taught in class.
  • prepare children for what they will be taught the next day.
  • provide children with the challenges and stimulus they need to engage in their classwork.

Perfect balance

NSW Department of Education curriculum expert Ken Olah says the homework policy, which schools use as a guide, is based on common sense.

"The amount of homework depends on the age of the student, the school context, the subject, the purpose for which the homework is set, and so on," he says.

"Homework should help build good learning habits; it shouldn't exhaust or turn kids off."

Schools develop their own homework policy with input from staff and parents. Ask your school for a copy.

If you find homework is becoming too much or is too difficult for your child, or there is something specific going on for your family that makes getting homework done a real challenge, have a chat with your child's teacher.