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Lechkova Homework Clip

Compounding

 Compounding is the word formation process in which two or more lexemes combine into a single new word. Compound words may be written as one word or as two words joined with a hyphen. For example:

  • noun-noun compound: note + book → notebook
  • adjective-noun compound: blue + berry → blueberry
  • verb-noun compound: work + room → workroom
  • noun-verb compound: breast + feed → breastfeed
  • verb-verb compound: stir + fry → stir-fry
  • adjective-verb compound: high + light → highlight
  • verb-preposition compound: break + up → breakup
  • preposition-verb compound: out + run → outrun
  • adjective-adjective compound: bitter + sweet → bittersweet
  • preposition-preposition compound: in + to → into

Compounds may be compositional, meaning that the meaning of the new word is determined by combining the meanings of the parts, or noncompositional, meaning that the meaning of the new word cannot be determined by combining the meanings of the parts. For example, a blueberry is a berry that is blue. However, a breakup is not a relationship that was severed into pieces in an upward direction.

Compound nouns should not be confused with nouns modified by adjectives, verbs, and other nouns. For example, the adjective black of the noun phrase black bird is different from the adjective black of the compound noun blackbird in that black of black bird functions as a noun phrase modifier while the black of blackbird is an inseparable part of the noun: a black bird also refers to any bird that is black in color while a blackbird is a specific type of bird.

Compounding

 Compounding is the word formation process in which two or more lexemes combine into a single new word. Compound words may be written as one word or as two words joined with a hyphen. For example:

  • noun-noun compound: note + book → notebook
  • adjective-noun compound: blue + berry → blueberry
  • verb-noun compound: work + room → workroom
  • noun-verb compound: breast + feed → breastfeed
  • verb-verb compound: stir + fry → stir-fry
  • adjective-verb compound: high + light → highlight
  • verb-preposition compound: break + up → breakup
  • preposition-verb compound: out + run → outrun
  • adjective-adjective compound: bitter + sweet → bittersweet
  • preposition-preposition compound: in + to → into

Compounds may be compositional, meaning that the meaning of the new word is determined by combining the meanings of the parts, or noncompositional, meaning that the meaning of the new word cannot be determined by combining the meanings of the parts. For example, a

blueberry is a berry that is blue. However, a breakup is not a relationship that was severed into pieces in an upward direction.

Compound nouns should not be confused with nouns modified by adjectives, verbs, and other nouns. For example, the adjective black of the noun phrase black bird is different from the adjective black of the compound noun blackbird in that black of black bird functions as a noun phrase modifier while the black of blackbird is an inseparable part of the noun: a black bird also refers to any bird that is black in color while a blackbird is a specific type of bird.